Visual sequential search might use a peripheral spatial ranking of the scene to put the next target of the sequence in the correct order. This strategy, indeed, might enhance the discriminative capacity of the human peripheral vision and spare neural resources associated with foveation. However, it is not known how exactly the peripheral vision sustains sequential search and whether the sparing of neural resources has a cost in terms of performance. To elucidate these issues, we compared strategy and performance during an alpha-numeric sequential task where peripheral vision was modulated in three different conditions: normal, blurred, or obscured. If spatial ranking is applied to increase the peripheral discrimination, its use as a strategy in visual sequencing should differ according to the degree of discriminative information that can be obtained from the periphery. Moreover, if this strategy spares neural resources without impairing the performance, its use should be associated with better performance. We found that spatial ranking was applied when peripheral vision was fully available, reducing the number and time of explorative fixations. When the periphery was obscured, explorative fixations were numerous and sparse; when the periphery was blurred, explorative fixations were longer and often located close to the items. Performance was significantly improved by this strategy. Our results demonstrated that spatial ranking is an efficient strategy adopted by the brain in visual sequencing to highlight peripheral detection and discrimination; it reduces the neural cost by avoiding unnecessary foveations, and promotes sequential search by facilitating the onset of a new saccade. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. KEYWORDS: covert attention; efficiency; human; overt attention; spatial pooling; trail making task

Veneri, G., Pretegiani, E., Fargnoli, F., Rosini, F., Vinciguerra, C., Federighi, P., et al. (2014). Spatial ranking strategy and enhanced peripheral vision discrimination optimize performance and efficiency of visual sequential search. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, 40(5), 2833 [10.1111/ejn.12639].

Spatial ranking strategy and enhanced peripheral vision discrimination optimize performance and efficiency of visual sequential search.

PRETEGIANI, ELENA;FARGNOLI, FRANCESCO;ROSINI, FRANCESCA;VINCIGUERRA, CLAUDIA;FEDERIGHI, PAMELA;FEDERICO, ANTONIO;RUFA, ALESSANDRA
2014-01-01

Abstract

Visual sequential search might use a peripheral spatial ranking of the scene to put the next target of the sequence in the correct order. This strategy, indeed, might enhance the discriminative capacity of the human peripheral vision and spare neural resources associated with foveation. However, it is not known how exactly the peripheral vision sustains sequential search and whether the sparing of neural resources has a cost in terms of performance. To elucidate these issues, we compared strategy and performance during an alpha-numeric sequential task where peripheral vision was modulated in three different conditions: normal, blurred, or obscured. If spatial ranking is applied to increase the peripheral discrimination, its use as a strategy in visual sequencing should differ according to the degree of discriminative information that can be obtained from the periphery. Moreover, if this strategy spares neural resources without impairing the performance, its use should be associated with better performance. We found that spatial ranking was applied when peripheral vision was fully available, reducing the number and time of explorative fixations. When the periphery was obscured, explorative fixations were numerous and sparse; when the periphery was blurred, explorative fixations were longer and often located close to the items. Performance was significantly improved by this strategy. Our results demonstrated that spatial ranking is an efficient strategy adopted by the brain in visual sequencing to highlight peripheral detection and discrimination; it reduces the neural cost by avoiding unnecessary foveations, and promotes sequential search by facilitating the onset of a new saccade. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. KEYWORDS: covert attention; efficiency; human; overt attention; spatial pooling; trail making task
Veneri, G., Pretegiani, E., Fargnoli, F., Rosini, F., Vinciguerra, C., Federighi, P., et al. (2014). Spatial ranking strategy and enhanced peripheral vision discrimination optimize performance and efficiency of visual sequential search. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, 40(5), 2833 [10.1111/ejn.12639].
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
veneri 14.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Pre-print
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 1.03 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.03 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11365/48874
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo