Preeclampsia (PE) (gestational proteinuric hypertension) is the leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality worldwide. Although placental endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress are known to contribute to PE, the exact pathological basis for this disorder remains unclear. Previously, we demonstrated that DNA damage at the maternal-fetal interface is more common in the placentas of women with PE than normotensive controls. In this study, we utilized an in vivo comparative study, including 20 preeclamptic women and 8 healthy control subjects, and an in vitro hypoxia/reperfusion model to mimic the effects of oxidative stress at the maternal-fetal interface. We tracked the spatial pattern of expression of 2 base excision repair proteins, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1 (APE1), at the maternal-fetal interface in response to oxidative stress. In vivo, we found a significant increase in OGG1 and APE1 concentrations in PE placental tissues as compared to normotensive controls (P < .0001). Further, our in vitro study revealed that OGG1 and APE1 expression is much greater in maternal cells (decidua) than in fetal cells (cytotrophoblasts) of placental tissue subjected to oxidative stress (P < .0001). Our results suggest that OGG1 and APE1 likely protect decidual cells from oxidative base damage.

Tadesse, S., Norwitz, N.G., Guller, S., ARCURI, F., TOTI, P., Norwitz, E.R., et al. (2016). Dynamics of Base Excision Repair at the Maternal-Fetal Interface in Pregnancies Complicated by Preeclampsia. REPRODUCTIVE SCIENCES [10.1177/1933719116670519].

Dynamics of Base Excision Repair at the Maternal-Fetal Interface in Pregnancies Complicated by Preeclampsia

ARCURI, FELICE;TOTI, PAOLO;
2016

Abstract

Preeclampsia (PE) (gestational proteinuric hypertension) is the leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality worldwide. Although placental endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress are known to contribute to PE, the exact pathological basis for this disorder remains unclear. Previously, we demonstrated that DNA damage at the maternal-fetal interface is more common in the placentas of women with PE than normotensive controls. In this study, we utilized an in vivo comparative study, including 20 preeclamptic women and 8 healthy control subjects, and an in vitro hypoxia/reperfusion model to mimic the effects of oxidative stress at the maternal-fetal interface. We tracked the spatial pattern of expression of 2 base excision repair proteins, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1 (APE1), at the maternal-fetal interface in response to oxidative stress. In vivo, we found a significant increase in OGG1 and APE1 concentrations in PE placental tissues as compared to normotensive controls (P < .0001). Further, our in vitro study revealed that OGG1 and APE1 expression is much greater in maternal cells (decidua) than in fetal cells (cytotrophoblasts) of placental tissue subjected to oxidative stress (P < .0001). Our results suggest that OGG1 and APE1 likely protect decidual cells from oxidative base damage.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/998748
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo