Geophysical prospection on 14 ha integrates the processing and interpretation of vertical multispectral and oblique aerial images for uncovering the archaeology of the Roman city of Altinum. This Iron Age and Roman harbour city was completely abandoned in the early Middle Ages, when people moved to nearby lagoon islands, and so the site is particularly fit for the application of non-invasive techniques. Primary aims of the research were to test the interpretation of archaeological structures in the city centre, estimate their degree of preservation in the subsoil, and update previous knowledge on the urban landscape. Target areas were identified first through remote sensing with later magnetic gradiometer mapping of the consular road (via Annia) and its adjoining streets, foundations of large buildings, theatres, temple and forum, a main canal with possible boatyard/storing place and workshops. Multi-electrode automatic resistivity profile produced a very detailed survey of the little theatre (odeon) and basilica. The groundpenetrating radar traced the city walls, while frequency-domain electromagnetics mapped the street pattern. Buried archaeological structures were located with an estimated error < 0.5 m. Floors and foundations of Roman buildings and infrastructures appear to be preserved between 0.5 and 2 m depth. They probably relate to a reorganization of the city, which occurred between the second half of the second century and the end of the first century BC, having via Annia and the forum as the main city axis, and incorporating few elements of the Iron Age settlement, such as the canal and city boundary. Eight city districts could be recognized, each one showing prevalent public, residential and other productive functions. In the ancient past the monumental buildings of the city were potentially visible from ships in the Adriatic Sea, and could act as nautical signals of the entrance to the lagoon along this low and otherwise monotonous coast. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Campana, S., Paolo, M., Alessandro, F., Francesco, F., Andrea, N., & Roberto, F. (2015). The Roman City of Altinum, Venice Lagoon, from Remote Sensing and Geophysical Prospection. ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROSPECTION, 22(3) [10.1002/arp.1520].

The Roman City of Altinum, Venice Lagoon, from Remote Sensing and Geophysical Prospection

CAMPANA, STEFANO;
2015

Abstract

Geophysical prospection on 14 ha integrates the processing and interpretation of vertical multispectral and oblique aerial images for uncovering the archaeology of the Roman city of Altinum. This Iron Age and Roman harbour city was completely abandoned in the early Middle Ages, when people moved to nearby lagoon islands, and so the site is particularly fit for the application of non-invasive techniques. Primary aims of the research were to test the interpretation of archaeological structures in the city centre, estimate their degree of preservation in the subsoil, and update previous knowledge on the urban landscape. Target areas were identified first through remote sensing with later magnetic gradiometer mapping of the consular road (via Annia) and its adjoining streets, foundations of large buildings, theatres, temple and forum, a main canal with possible boatyard/storing place and workshops. Multi-electrode automatic resistivity profile produced a very detailed survey of the little theatre (odeon) and basilica. The groundpenetrating radar traced the city walls, while frequency-domain electromagnetics mapped the street pattern. Buried archaeological structures were located with an estimated error < 0.5 m. Floors and foundations of Roman buildings and infrastructures appear to be preserved between 0.5 and 2 m depth. They probably relate to a reorganization of the city, which occurred between the second half of the second century and the end of the first century BC, having via Annia and the forum as the main city axis, and incorporating few elements of the Iron Age settlement, such as the canal and city boundary. Eight city districts could be recognized, each one showing prevalent public, residential and other productive functions. In the ancient past the monumental buildings of the city were potentially visible from ships in the Adriatic Sea, and could act as nautical signals of the entrance to the lagoon along this low and otherwise monotonous coast. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/982303