Allyl alcohol administration to starved mice produced, along with liver necrosis, a high incidence (about 50%) of hemolysis. A marked decrease in erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) was seen in all the intoxicated animals. Such a decrease was significantly higher in the animals showing hemolysis. In these animals a substantial amount of malonic dialdehyde (MDA) was detected in plasma and a marked decrease in arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids was found in erythrocyte phospholipids. These data suggest that the allyl alcohol-induced hemolysis is mediated by lipid peroxidation. In vitro studies have shown that the addition of acrolein to mouse erythrocytes produces a dramatic GSH depletion, which is followed by the appearance of lipid peroxidation and, after an additional 30 min of incubation, by the development of hemolysis. Prevention of lipid peroxidation by an antioxidant (Trolox C) or an iron chelator (desferrioxamine, DFO), prevented hemolysis even if the erythrocyte GSH level was dramatically decreased. In vitro, allyl alcohol and acrylic acid were ineffective in inducing GSH depletion, lipid peroxidation and hemolysis. Studies of possible induction of lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes showed that a progressive increase in "free" (desferal chelatable) iron occurs in the erythrocytes during the incubation with acrolein. It seems, therefore, that a release of iron from iron-containing complexes occurs in acrolein-treated erythrocytes and that such "free" iron promotes lipid peroxidation. © 1989.

Ferrali, M., Ciccoli, L., Comporti, M. (1989). Allyl alcohol-induced hemolysis and its relation to iron release and lipid peroxidation. BIOCHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 38(11), 1819-1825 [10.1016/0006-2952(89)90417-6].

Allyl alcohol-induced hemolysis and its relation to iron release and lipid peroxidation

FERRALI, M.;CICCOLI, L.;COMPORTI, M.
1989-01-01

Abstract

Allyl alcohol administration to starved mice produced, along with liver necrosis, a high incidence (about 50%) of hemolysis. A marked decrease in erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) was seen in all the intoxicated animals. Such a decrease was significantly higher in the animals showing hemolysis. In these animals a substantial amount of malonic dialdehyde (MDA) was detected in plasma and a marked decrease in arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids was found in erythrocyte phospholipids. These data suggest that the allyl alcohol-induced hemolysis is mediated by lipid peroxidation. In vitro studies have shown that the addition of acrolein to mouse erythrocytes produces a dramatic GSH depletion, which is followed by the appearance of lipid peroxidation and, after an additional 30 min of incubation, by the development of hemolysis. Prevention of lipid peroxidation by an antioxidant (Trolox C) or an iron chelator (desferrioxamine, DFO), prevented hemolysis even if the erythrocyte GSH level was dramatically decreased. In vitro, allyl alcohol and acrylic acid were ineffective in inducing GSH depletion, lipid peroxidation and hemolysis. Studies of possible induction of lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes showed that a progressive increase in "free" (desferal chelatable) iron occurs in the erythrocytes during the incubation with acrolein. It seems, therefore, that a release of iron from iron-containing complexes occurs in acrolein-treated erythrocytes and that such "free" iron promotes lipid peroxidation. © 1989.
Ferrali, M., Ciccoli, L., Comporti, M. (1989). Allyl alcohol-induced hemolysis and its relation to iron release and lipid peroxidation. BIOCHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 38(11), 1819-1825 [10.1016/0006-2952(89)90417-6].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11365/6906
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