The aim of this study is to compare the clinical features and the perioperative and long-term outcomes after primary surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in the elderly population with those observed in younger patients. All the patients over the age of 55 who underwent primary surgery for CRC in our clinic from 1988 to 2008 were included in this study and divided into two age groups: 55-75 and >75 years considering the age of diagnosis. 914 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study (352 > 75 years). In the elderly group, tumors were predominantly right sided, and the overall number of comorbidities was statistical more frequent. Elderly patients underwent emergency surgery more than the control group (p = 0.0008). There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of curative and palliative resections. The overall operative mortality rate was 5.9% in the study group compared with 2.1% in the control study (p = 0.0033). The overall 3-year, 5-year and 10-year survival rates were, respectively, 37, 16.2 and 5.1% in the study group, when compared with 52.3, 35.1 and 24.7% in the control group (p = 0.022, p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0001, respectively). More patients were lost during the follow-up in the elderly group (p = 0.0003) and more deaths unrelated to cancer were found in the study group compared with the control group (p = 0.0005). The cancer specific mortality was similar between the two groups. In conclusion, elderly patients that underwent major colorectal resection have an acceptable perioperative morbidity, mortality and survival rate when compared with younger patients. Age alone should not be considered a reason to deny surgery to these patients

Fontani, A., Martellucci, J., Civitelli, S., & Tanzini, G. (2011). Outcome of surgical treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly. UPDATES IN SURGERY, 63(4), 233-237 [10.1007/s13304-011-0085-4].

Outcome of surgical treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly.

CIVITELLI, SERENELLA;
2011

Abstract

The aim of this study is to compare the clinical features and the perioperative and long-term outcomes after primary surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in the elderly population with those observed in younger patients. All the patients over the age of 55 who underwent primary surgery for CRC in our clinic from 1988 to 2008 were included in this study and divided into two age groups: 55-75 and >75 years considering the age of diagnosis. 914 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study (352 > 75 years). In the elderly group, tumors were predominantly right sided, and the overall number of comorbidities was statistical more frequent. Elderly patients underwent emergency surgery more than the control group (p = 0.0008). There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of curative and palliative resections. The overall operative mortality rate was 5.9% in the study group compared with 2.1% in the control study (p = 0.0033). The overall 3-year, 5-year and 10-year survival rates were, respectively, 37, 16.2 and 5.1% in the study group, when compared with 52.3, 35.1 and 24.7% in the control group (p = 0.022, p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0001, respectively). More patients were lost during the follow-up in the elderly group (p = 0.0003) and more deaths unrelated to cancer were found in the study group compared with the control group (p = 0.0005). The cancer specific mortality was similar between the two groups. In conclusion, elderly patients that underwent major colorectal resection have an acceptable perioperative morbidity, mortality and survival rate when compared with younger patients. Age alone should not be considered a reason to deny surgery to these patients
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/43792
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