Abstract The activity of 68 neurons, mainly Purkinje cells, was recorded from the cerebellar anterior vermis of decerebrate cats during wobble of the whole animal (at 0.156Hz, 5°), a mixture of tilt and rotation, leading to stimulation of labyrinth receptors. Most of the neurons (65/68) were affected by both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Twenty-four units showing responses of comparable amplitude to these stimuli (narrowly tuned cells) were represented by a single vector (S(max)), whose preferred direction corresponded to the direction of stimulation giving rise to the maximal response. The remaining 41 units, however, showed different amplitude responses to these rotations (broadly tuned cells) and were characterized by two spatially and temporally orthogonal vectors (S(max) and S(min)), suggesting that labyrinthine signals with different spatial and temporal properties converged on these cells. All these units were tested while the body was aligned with the head (control position), as well as after static displacement of the body under a fixed head by 15°and/or 30°around a vertical axis passing through C1-C2, thus leading to stimulation of neck receptors. The orientation component of the response vector of the Purkinje cells to vestibular stimulation changed following body-to-head displacement. Moreover, the amplitude of vector rotation corresponded, on the average, to that of body rotation. Changes in temporal phase, gain and tuning ratio of the responses were also observed.We propose that information from neck receptors regulates the convergence of labyrinthine signals with different spatial and temporal properties on corticocerebellar units. Due to their strict relationship with the motor system, these units may give rise to appropriate responses in the limb musculature, by modifying the spatial organization of the vestibulospinal reflexes according to the requirements of body stability. The cerebellar vermis may thus represent an important structure, where frames of reference can be altered to account for changes in position of trunk, head and neck.

Manzoni, D., Pompeiano, O., Bruschini, L., & Andre, P. (1999). Neck input modifies the reference frame for coding labyrinthine signals in the cerebellar vermis: a cellular analysis. NEUROSCIENCE, 93(3), 1095-1107 [10.1016/S0306-4522(99)00275-4].

Neck input modifies the reference frame for coding labyrinthine signals in the cerebellar vermis: a cellular analysis.

ANDRE, PAOLO
1999

Abstract

Abstract The activity of 68 neurons, mainly Purkinje cells, was recorded from the cerebellar anterior vermis of decerebrate cats during wobble of the whole animal (at 0.156Hz, 5°), a mixture of tilt and rotation, leading to stimulation of labyrinth receptors. Most of the neurons (65/68) were affected by both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Twenty-four units showing responses of comparable amplitude to these stimuli (narrowly tuned cells) were represented by a single vector (S(max)), whose preferred direction corresponded to the direction of stimulation giving rise to the maximal response. The remaining 41 units, however, showed different amplitude responses to these rotations (broadly tuned cells) and were characterized by two spatially and temporally orthogonal vectors (S(max) and S(min)), suggesting that labyrinthine signals with different spatial and temporal properties converged on these cells. All these units were tested while the body was aligned with the head (control position), as well as after static displacement of the body under a fixed head by 15°and/or 30°around a vertical axis passing through C1-C2, thus leading to stimulation of neck receptors. The orientation component of the response vector of the Purkinje cells to vestibular stimulation changed following body-to-head displacement. Moreover, the amplitude of vector rotation corresponded, on the average, to that of body rotation. Changes in temporal phase, gain and tuning ratio of the responses were also observed.We propose that information from neck receptors regulates the convergence of labyrinthine signals with different spatial and temporal properties on corticocerebellar units. Due to their strict relationship with the motor system, these units may give rise to appropriate responses in the limb musculature, by modifying the spatial organization of the vestibulospinal reflexes according to the requirements of body stability. The cerebellar vermis may thus represent an important structure, where frames of reference can be altered to account for changes in position of trunk, head and neck.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/419009
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