Genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors contribute to disease susceptibility in systemic lupus erythematosus. Among environmental factors, infectious agents play a major role. When considering the complex relationship between genetic predisposition and infections in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, we have to consider that infectious agents can interact with the immune system in several ways. For example, molecular mimicry, altered apoptosis of the host cells, exposure of as yet masked antigens to the immune system by a given microorganism, and direct viral invasion of immunocompetent cells are all mechanisms that may give rise to dysfunction of the immune system; in addition, some genetically determined deficit of the immune system, such as complement deficiency or deficit of mannose binding lectine, may cause insufficient clearance of infectious agents, whose persistence in the host may determine autoimmunity. Finally, evidence has been emerging suggesting that the production of autoantibodies, by infected B-lymphocytes, may be drawn by altered expression of particular microRNA in these cells. In this paper, we review some of the distinct scenarios that can account for the role of infectious agents, acting on a genetically prone host, in determining systemic lupus erythematosus.

Sebastiani, G.d., & Galeazzi, M. (2009). Infection-genetics relationship in systemic lupus erythematosus. LUPUS, 18(13), 1169-1175.

Infection-genetics relationship in systemic lupus erythematosus.

GALEAZZI, MAURO
2009

Abstract

Genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors contribute to disease susceptibility in systemic lupus erythematosus. Among environmental factors, infectious agents play a major role. When considering the complex relationship between genetic predisposition and infections in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, we have to consider that infectious agents can interact with the immune system in several ways. For example, molecular mimicry, altered apoptosis of the host cells, exposure of as yet masked antigens to the immune system by a given microorganism, and direct viral invasion of immunocompetent cells are all mechanisms that may give rise to dysfunction of the immune system; in addition, some genetically determined deficit of the immune system, such as complement deficiency or deficit of mannose binding lectine, may cause insufficient clearance of infectious agents, whose persistence in the host may determine autoimmunity. Finally, evidence has been emerging suggesting that the production of autoantibodies, by infected B-lymphocytes, may be drawn by altered expression of particular microRNA in these cells. In this paper, we review some of the distinct scenarios that can account for the role of infectious agents, acting on a genetically prone host, in determining systemic lupus erythematosus.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/37871
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