AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Beta cell failure is a crucial component in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. One of the proposed mechanisms of beta cell failure is local inflammation, but the presence of pancreatic islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms involved remain under debate. METHODS: Chemokine and cytokine expression was studied by microarray analysis of laser-capture microdissected islets from pancreases obtained from ten non-diabetic and ten type 2 diabetic donors, and by real-time PCR of human islets exposed to oleate or palmitate at 6 or 28 mmol/l glucose. The cellular source of the chemokines was analysed by immunofluorescence of pancreatic sections from individuals without diabetes and with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Microarray analysis of laser-capture microdissected beta cells showed increased chemokine and cytokine expression in type 2 diabetes compared with non-diabetic controls. The inflammatory response in type 2 diabetes was mimicked by exposure of non-diabetic human islets to palmitate, but not to oleate or high glucose, leading to the induction of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). Interference with IL-1beta signalling abolished palmitate-induced cytokine and chemokine expression but failed to prevent lipotoxic human islet cell death. Palmitate activated nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) in human pancreatic beta and non-beta cells, and chemically induced endoplasmic reticulum stress caused cytokine expression and NF-kappaB activation similar to that occurring with palmitate. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Saturated-fatty-acid-induced NF-kappaB activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress may contribute to IL-1beta production and mild islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes. This inflammatory process does not contribute to lipotoxicity ex vivo, but may lead to local chemokine release.

IGOILLO ESTEVE, M., Marselli, L., Cunha, D.A., Ladrière, L., Ortis, F., Grieco, F.A., et al. (2010). Palmitate induces a pro-inflammatory response in human pancreatic islets that mimics CCL2 expression by beta cells in type 2 diabetes. DIABETOLOGIA, 53(7), 1395-1405 [10.1007/s00125-010-1707-y].

Palmitate induces a pro-inflammatory response in human pancreatic islets that mimics CCL2 expression by beta cells in type 2 diabetes.

DOTTA, FRANCESCO;
2010

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Beta cell failure is a crucial component in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. One of the proposed mechanisms of beta cell failure is local inflammation, but the presence of pancreatic islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms involved remain under debate. METHODS: Chemokine and cytokine expression was studied by microarray analysis of laser-capture microdissected islets from pancreases obtained from ten non-diabetic and ten type 2 diabetic donors, and by real-time PCR of human islets exposed to oleate or palmitate at 6 or 28 mmol/l glucose. The cellular source of the chemokines was analysed by immunofluorescence of pancreatic sections from individuals without diabetes and with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Microarray analysis of laser-capture microdissected beta cells showed increased chemokine and cytokine expression in type 2 diabetes compared with non-diabetic controls. The inflammatory response in type 2 diabetes was mimicked by exposure of non-diabetic human islets to palmitate, but not to oleate or high glucose, leading to the induction of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). Interference with IL-1beta signalling abolished palmitate-induced cytokine and chemokine expression but failed to prevent lipotoxic human islet cell death. Palmitate activated nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) in human pancreatic beta and non-beta cells, and chemically induced endoplasmic reticulum stress caused cytokine expression and NF-kappaB activation similar to that occurring with palmitate. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Saturated-fatty-acid-induced NF-kappaB activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress may contribute to IL-1beta production and mild islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes. This inflammatory process does not contribute to lipotoxicity ex vivo, but may lead to local chemokine release.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/33405
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