Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals frequently develop a broad spectrum of neurological syndromes, classified as HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex. Diffuse demyelination of hemispheric white matter is a commonly observed in HIV-1 infected brain, but the events leading to myelin destruction are still obscure. Since oligodendrocyte infection by HIV-1 is not proven as yet, myelin damage in HIV-1 infection may result from indirect mechanisms such as the excessive release of myelinotoxic substances or the triggering of autoimmune responses directed to myelin constituents. To verify the latter hypothesis, we searched for elevated anti-myelin basic protein (MBP) IgG levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of 25 patients with HIV-1 infection, 12 with multiple sclerosis (MS), and 9 with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND). CSF, but not serum, anti-MBP IgG levels were more frequently elevated in HIV-1+ (16/25, 64%) than in MS (3/12, 25%) or NIND (0/9) patients. By using the anti-MBP IgG index, the anti-MBP IgG antibody specificity index (ASI), and the search for anti-MBP oligoclonal IgG, we ascertained that anti-MBP IgG were produced within the CNS in 13 of 25 (52%) HIV-1+, in 6 of 12 (50%) MS, and in none of NIND patients. The incidence of increased CSF anti-MBP IgG levels was higher among HIV-1+ patients at stage II-III (4/4, 100%) or at stage IV B (7/9, 78%) than among those at stage IV C-IV D (5/12, 42%). Although our data indicate that intrathecal anti-MBP IgG may occur early during HIV-1 infection and that they are more common in patients with HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex, the possible demyelinating role of these antibodies remains to be demonstrated.

Maimone, D., Annunziata, P., Cioni, C., Leonardi, A., & Guazzi, G.C. (1994). Intrathecal synthesis of anti-myelin basic protein IgG in HIV-1+ patients. ACTA NEUROLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, 90, 285-292 [10.1111/j.1600-0404.1994.tb02723.x].

Intrathecal synthesis of anti-myelin basic protein IgG in HIV-1+ patients

ANNUNZIATA, PASQUALE;
1994

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals frequently develop a broad spectrum of neurological syndromes, classified as HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex. Diffuse demyelination of hemispheric white matter is a commonly observed in HIV-1 infected brain, but the events leading to myelin destruction are still obscure. Since oligodendrocyte infection by HIV-1 is not proven as yet, myelin damage in HIV-1 infection may result from indirect mechanisms such as the excessive release of myelinotoxic substances or the triggering of autoimmune responses directed to myelin constituents. To verify the latter hypothesis, we searched for elevated anti-myelin basic protein (MBP) IgG levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of 25 patients with HIV-1 infection, 12 with multiple sclerosis (MS), and 9 with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND). CSF, but not serum, anti-MBP IgG levels were more frequently elevated in HIV-1+ (16/25, 64%) than in MS (3/12, 25%) or NIND (0/9) patients. By using the anti-MBP IgG index, the anti-MBP IgG antibody specificity index (ASI), and the search for anti-MBP oligoclonal IgG, we ascertained that anti-MBP IgG were produced within the CNS in 13 of 25 (52%) HIV-1+, in 6 of 12 (50%) MS, and in none of NIND patients. The incidence of increased CSF anti-MBP IgG levels was higher among HIV-1+ patients at stage II-III (4/4, 100%) or at stage IV B (7/9, 78%) than among those at stage IV C-IV D (5/12, 42%). Although our data indicate that intrathecal anti-MBP IgG may occur early during HIV-1 infection and that they are more common in patients with HIV-1-associated cognitive/motor complex, the possible demyelinating role of these antibodies remains to be demonstrated.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/33327
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