Introduction: Endocrine disrupter chemicals (EDCs) are environmental pollutants of agricultural or industrial origin which may influence human reproductive health. By mimicking and/or antagonizing steroid hormones, these substances produce deleterious effects on reproduction and embryonic development. In this study we evaluated the effect of EDCs with estrogen-like activity including, para-nonylphenol (p-NP), Bisphenol A (BPA), Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and Resveratrol (RSV) for in vitro studies on human placenta. Material and Methods: BeWo cell cultures were used to identify chemical lethal concentration able to reduce 50% of cell viability (LC50). Primary cultures of chorionic villous explants from first trimester human placenta were used to perform functional studies of EDCs at non-toxic but environmentally relevant concentrations. Vehicle-treated cultures were used as negative controls. Results: Experiments in BeWo cells showed an LC50 ranging from 4.56 x 10-5 M to 1.72 x 10-4 M with DES the most and RSV the less active. Lower non-toxic concentrations were able to interfere with hormone (β-human chorionic gonadotropin, β-hCG) secretion. Explant cultures revealed that concentrations of 10-9 M for p-NP, BPA and DES and 10-6 M for RSV exerted a differentiative effect on trophoblast and cellular apoptosis by increasing β-hCG secretion and caspase-3 activity. Conclusions: These results raise concern about maternal exposure to these chemicals during pregnancy and suggest a possible involvement of environmental factors in pregnancy complications.

Ricci, L., Bechi, N., Ietta, F., Bhattacharjee, J., Romagnoli, R., Buffi, C. (2011). Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals in human placenta. In Abstracts book of the 1° Annual world congress of endobolism 2011.

Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals in human placenta

Ricci, L.;Ietta, F.;Bhattacharjee, J.;Romagnoli, R.;
2011-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: Endocrine disrupter chemicals (EDCs) are environmental pollutants of agricultural or industrial origin which may influence human reproductive health. By mimicking and/or antagonizing steroid hormones, these substances produce deleterious effects on reproduction and embryonic development. In this study we evaluated the effect of EDCs with estrogen-like activity including, para-nonylphenol (p-NP), Bisphenol A (BPA), Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and Resveratrol (RSV) for in vitro studies on human placenta. Material and Methods: BeWo cell cultures were used to identify chemical lethal concentration able to reduce 50% of cell viability (LC50). Primary cultures of chorionic villous explants from first trimester human placenta were used to perform functional studies of EDCs at non-toxic but environmentally relevant concentrations. Vehicle-treated cultures were used as negative controls. Results: Experiments in BeWo cells showed an LC50 ranging from 4.56 x 10-5 M to 1.72 x 10-4 M with DES the most and RSV the less active. Lower non-toxic concentrations were able to interfere with hormone (β-human chorionic gonadotropin, β-hCG) secretion. Explant cultures revealed that concentrations of 10-9 M for p-NP, BPA and DES and 10-6 M for RSV exerted a differentiative effect on trophoblast and cellular apoptosis by increasing β-hCG secretion and caspase-3 activity. Conclusions: These results raise concern about maternal exposure to these chemicals during pregnancy and suggest a possible involvement of environmental factors in pregnancy complications.
Ricci, L., Bechi, N., Ietta, F., Bhattacharjee, J., Romagnoli, R., Buffi, C. (2011). Effect of Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals in human placenta. In Abstracts book of the 1° Annual world congress of endobolism 2011.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11365/28549
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