We investigated the readiness to quit and the smoking cessation rates of smokers requiring bronchoscopy and receiving advice quitting. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of two smoking cessation interventions, either a brief advice (control group), or a longer support, delivered at the time of bronchoscopy. We consecutively enrolled 233 adult smokers, regardless of the initial level of motivation to quit. Their mean (SD) age was 57 (12) years; males were 192. They had smoked a median of 44.5 pack-years. Their mean (SD) Fagerstrom score was 8 (2). There was no difference between groups. Surprisingly, 45% of participants were in the action stage at baseline; these 105 subjects had quit in the week immediately prior to the bronchoscopy. At 6- and 12-months follow-up visits, respectively 41% and 29% of participants in the intervention group and 27% and 13% in the control group objectively showed a 1-week point prevalence abstinence. The difference was significant at 6 months (p<0.05) but not at 1-year visit (p=0.052), even if there was a trend towards greater cessation rate in the intervention group. In multivariable logistic models, at the final visit being a quitter was positively associated with having been in the action stage at baseline and negatively with the Fagerstrom score and the presence of smokers in household. We conclude that the time of bronchoscopy may possibly predispose smokers to quit. Further efforts are needed to clear whether more protracted support might achieve higher long-term smoking cessation rates.

Martucci, P., Sestini, P., Canessa, P.a., Brancaccio, L., Guarino, C., Barbato, N., et al. (2010). Smoking cessation in patients requiring bronchoscopy: the Bronchoscopy AntiSmoking Study (BASIS). RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, 104(1), 61-66 [10.1016/j.rmed.2009.08.002].

Smoking cessation in patients requiring bronchoscopy: the Bronchoscopy AntiSmoking Study (BASIS).

SESTINI P;
2010

Abstract

We investigated the readiness to quit and the smoking cessation rates of smokers requiring bronchoscopy and receiving advice quitting. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of two smoking cessation interventions, either a brief advice (control group), or a longer support, delivered at the time of bronchoscopy. We consecutively enrolled 233 adult smokers, regardless of the initial level of motivation to quit. Their mean (SD) age was 57 (12) years; males were 192. They had smoked a median of 44.5 pack-years. Their mean (SD) Fagerstrom score was 8 (2). There was no difference between groups. Surprisingly, 45% of participants were in the action stage at baseline; these 105 subjects had quit in the week immediately prior to the bronchoscopy. At 6- and 12-months follow-up visits, respectively 41% and 29% of participants in the intervention group and 27% and 13% in the control group objectively showed a 1-week point prevalence abstinence. The difference was significant at 6 months (p<0.05) but not at 1-year visit (p=0.052), even if there was a trend towards greater cessation rate in the intervention group. In multivariable logistic models, at the final visit being a quitter was positively associated with having been in the action stage at baseline and negatively with the Fagerstrom score and the presence of smokers in household. We conclude that the time of bronchoscopy may possibly predispose smokers to quit. Further efforts are needed to clear whether more protracted support might achieve higher long-term smoking cessation rates.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/28134
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