BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder has been associated with poor functional outcomes. We examined the relation of self-reported cognitive problems to employment trajectory in patients diagnosed with bipolar I disorder. METHODS: 154 bipolar I disorder patients were followed for 15-43months at the Bipolar Disorders Center for Pennsylvanians. Using a multinomial logistic regression we examined predictors of employment group including self-reported cognitive problems, mood symptoms, education and age. Cognitive functioning was measured via 4 self-report items assessing memory/concentration at baseline and termination. Employment status was recorded at baseline and termination. Employment was categorized as working (full-time, part-time, homemaker, volunteer) or not working (leave of absence, disability, unemployed, no longer volunteering) at each time point. Patients were categorized as good stable, improving, worsening and poor stable. RESULTS: Baseline self-reported concentration problems and years of education significantly predicted employment trajectory. LIMITATIONS: Post-hoc analyses of existing clinical data. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported concentration problems assessed in the context of specific areas of functioning may serve as a sensitive predictor of functional outcome in patients diagnosed with bipolar I disorder.

Gilbert, A.M., Olino, T.M., Houck, P., Fagiolini, A., Kupfer, D.J., & Frank, E. (2010). Self reported cognitive problems predict employment trajectory in patients with bipolar I disorder. JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, 124(3), 324-328 [10.1016/j.jad.2009.11.012].

Self reported cognitive problems predict employment trajectory in patients with bipolar I disorder

FAGIOLINI, A.;
2010

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder has been associated with poor functional outcomes. We examined the relation of self-reported cognitive problems to employment trajectory in patients diagnosed with bipolar I disorder. METHODS: 154 bipolar I disorder patients were followed for 15-43months at the Bipolar Disorders Center for Pennsylvanians. Using a multinomial logistic regression we examined predictors of employment group including self-reported cognitive problems, mood symptoms, education and age. Cognitive functioning was measured via 4 self-report items assessing memory/concentration at baseline and termination. Employment status was recorded at baseline and termination. Employment was categorized as working (full-time, part-time, homemaker, volunteer) or not working (leave of absence, disability, unemployed, no longer volunteering) at each time point. Patients were categorized as good stable, improving, worsening and poor stable. RESULTS: Baseline self-reported concentration problems and years of education significantly predicted employment trajectory. LIMITATIONS: Post-hoc analyses of existing clinical data. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported concentration problems assessed in the context of specific areas of functioning may serve as a sensitive predictor of functional outcome in patients diagnosed with bipolar I disorder.
Gilbert, A.M., Olino, T.M., Houck, P., Fagiolini, A., Kupfer, D.J., & Frank, E. (2010). Self reported cognitive problems predict employment trajectory in patients with bipolar I disorder. JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, 124(3), 324-328 [10.1016/j.jad.2009.11.012].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/26714
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