Secondary lymphedema of the extremities affects millions of people in the world as a common side effect of oncological treatments with heavy impact on every day life of patients and on the health care system. One of the surgical techniques for lymphedema treatment is the creation of a local connection between lymphatic vessels and veins, facilitating drainage of lymphatic fluid into the circulatory system. Successful results, however, rely on using a functional vessel for the anastomosis, and vessel function, in turn, depends on its structure. The structure of lymphatic collecting vessels changes with the progression of lymphedema. They appear initially dilated by excess interstitial fluid entered at capillary level. The number of lymphatic smooth muscle cells in their media then increases in the attempt to overcome the impaired drainage. When lymphatic muscle cells hyperplasia occurs at the expenses of the lumen, vessel patency decreases hampering lymph flow. Finally, collagen fiber accumulation leads to complete occlusion of the lumen rendering the vessel unfit to conduct lymph. Different types of vessels may coexist in the same patient but usually the distal part of the limb contains less affected vessels that are more likely to perform efficient lymphatic-venular anastomosis. Here we review the structure of the lymphatic collecting vessels in health and in lymphedema, focusing on the histopathological changes of the lymphatic vessel wall based on the observations on segments of the vessels used for lymphatic-venular anastomoses.

Weber, E., Aglianò, M., Bertelli, E., Gabriele, G., Gennaro, P., & Barone, V. (2022). Lymphatic Collecting Vessels in Health and Disease: A Review of Histopathological Modifications in Lymphedema. LYMPHATIC RESEARCH AND BIOLOGY [10.1089/lrb.2021.0090].

Lymphatic Collecting Vessels in Health and Disease: A Review of Histopathological Modifications in Lymphedema

Weber, Elisabetta;Aglianò, Margherita;Bertelli, Eugenio;Gabriele, Guido;Gennaro, Paolo;Barone, Virginia
2022

Abstract

Secondary lymphedema of the extremities affects millions of people in the world as a common side effect of oncological treatments with heavy impact on every day life of patients and on the health care system. One of the surgical techniques for lymphedema treatment is the creation of a local connection between lymphatic vessels and veins, facilitating drainage of lymphatic fluid into the circulatory system. Successful results, however, rely on using a functional vessel for the anastomosis, and vessel function, in turn, depends on its structure. The structure of lymphatic collecting vessels changes with the progression of lymphedema. They appear initially dilated by excess interstitial fluid entered at capillary level. The number of lymphatic smooth muscle cells in their media then increases in the attempt to overcome the impaired drainage. When lymphatic muscle cells hyperplasia occurs at the expenses of the lumen, vessel patency decreases hampering lymph flow. Finally, collagen fiber accumulation leads to complete occlusion of the lumen rendering the vessel unfit to conduct lymph. Different types of vessels may coexist in the same patient but usually the distal part of the limb contains less affected vessels that are more likely to perform efficient lymphatic-venular anastomosis. Here we review the structure of the lymphatic collecting vessels in health and in lymphedema, focusing on the histopathological changes of the lymphatic vessel wall based on the observations on segments of the vessels used for lymphatic-venular anastomoses.
Weber, E., Aglianò, M., Bertelli, E., Gabriele, G., Gennaro, P., & Barone, V. (2022). Lymphatic Collecting Vessels in Health and Disease: A Review of Histopathological Modifications in Lymphedema. LYMPHATIC RESEARCH AND BIOLOGY [10.1089/lrb.2021.0090].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/1179509