Background: Previous studies have shown that music preferences are influenced by cultural “rules”, and some others have suggested a universal preference for some features over others. Methods: We investigated cultural differences on the “consonance effect”, consisting in higher pleasantness judgments for consonant compared to dissonant chords—according to the Western definition of music: Italian and Himalayan participants were asked to express pleasantness judgments for consonant and dissonant chords. An Italian and a Nepalese sample were tested both at 1,450 m and at 4,750 m of altitude, with the further aim to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on this task. A third sample consisted of two subgroups of Sherpas: lowlanders (1,450 m of altitude), often exposed to Western music, and highlanders (3,427 m of altitude), less exposed to Western music. All Sherpas were tested where they lived. Results: Independently from the altitude, results confirmed the consonance effect in the Italian sample, and the absence of such effect in the Nepalese sample. Lowlander Sherpas revealed the consonance effect, but highlander Sherpas did not show this effect. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study show that neither hypoxia (altitude), nor demographic features (age, schooling, or playing music), nor ethnicity per se influence the consonance effect. We conclude that music preferences are attributable to music exposure.

Prete, G., Bondi, D., Verratti, V., Aloisi, A.M., Rai, P., & Tommasi, L. (2020). Universality vs experience: A cross-cultural pilot study on the consonance effect in music at different altitudes. PEERJ, 2020(7), e9344 [10.7717/peerj.9344].

Universality vs experience: A cross-cultural pilot study on the consonance effect in music at different altitudes

Bondi D.;Verratti V.
;
Aloisi A. M.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2020

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have shown that music preferences are influenced by cultural “rules”, and some others have suggested a universal preference for some features over others. Methods: We investigated cultural differences on the “consonance effect”, consisting in higher pleasantness judgments for consonant compared to dissonant chords—according to the Western definition of music: Italian and Himalayan participants were asked to express pleasantness judgments for consonant and dissonant chords. An Italian and a Nepalese sample were tested both at 1,450 m and at 4,750 m of altitude, with the further aim to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on this task. A third sample consisted of two subgroups of Sherpas: lowlanders (1,450 m of altitude), often exposed to Western music, and highlanders (3,427 m of altitude), less exposed to Western music. All Sherpas were tested where they lived. Results: Independently from the altitude, results confirmed the consonance effect in the Italian sample, and the absence of such effect in the Nepalese sample. Lowlander Sherpas revealed the consonance effect, but highlander Sherpas did not show this effect. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study show that neither hypoxia (altitude), nor demographic features (age, schooling, or playing music), nor ethnicity per se influence the consonance effect. We conclude that music preferences are attributable to music exposure.
Prete, G., Bondi, D., Verratti, V., Aloisi, A.M., Rai, P., & Tommasi, L. (2020). Universality vs experience: A cross-cultural pilot study on the consonance effect in music at different altitudes. PEERJ, 2020(7), e9344 [10.7717/peerj.9344].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/1142974
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