Background: Lymphedema is a chronic pathology characterized by progressive swelling due to lymphatic dysfunction (1). Literature contains few studies that focus on male genital lymphedema. A variety of surgical techniques as part of the male genital lymphedema therapeutic strategy has been described. Supramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis s-LVA, based on connecting lymphatic collectors to venules, has evidenced efficient outcomes thus far. However, the peculiarity of the genital area may lead to an innovative and even more accurate surgical technique as a treatment of male genital lymphedema: lymphatic pre-collectors located superficially over the fascial layer can be used to perform the ultramicrosurgical anastomosis. Purpose of the study: In this paper, the authors report their experience of this new surgical concept based on anastomosing lymphatic precollectors to venules. Methods: We performed a retrospective study from 2014 to 2016. Six male patients with primary genital lymphedema underwent ultramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis in Siena University Hospital, Italy. Results: Ultramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis has evidenced positive outcomes in terms of prognosis, infectious complications, volume reduction, and quality of life. The average cellulitis rate dropped from 2.5 episodes a year to 0.5 episodes after surgical intervention. The mean satisfaction index passed from 1.33 before the intervention to 2.83. Conclusion: Ultramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis represents a challenging physiological approach for male genital lymphedema with promising outcomes. © 2019 The Authors

Gennaro, P., Gabriele, G., Aboh, I.V., Cascino, F., Zerini, F., & Aboud, M.G. (2019). Ultramicrosurgery: A new approach to treat primary male genital lymphedema. JPRAS OPEN, 20, 72-80 [10.1016/j.jpra.2019.01.007].

Ultramicrosurgery: A new approach to treat primary male genital lymphedema

Gennaro P.;Gabriele G.;Aboh I. V.;Cascino F.;Aboud M. G.
2019

Abstract

Background: Lymphedema is a chronic pathology characterized by progressive swelling due to lymphatic dysfunction (1). Literature contains few studies that focus on male genital lymphedema. A variety of surgical techniques as part of the male genital lymphedema therapeutic strategy has been described. Supramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis s-LVA, based on connecting lymphatic collectors to venules, has evidenced efficient outcomes thus far. However, the peculiarity of the genital area may lead to an innovative and even more accurate surgical technique as a treatment of male genital lymphedema: lymphatic pre-collectors located superficially over the fascial layer can be used to perform the ultramicrosurgical anastomosis. Purpose of the study: In this paper, the authors report their experience of this new surgical concept based on anastomosing lymphatic precollectors to venules. Methods: We performed a retrospective study from 2014 to 2016. Six male patients with primary genital lymphedema underwent ultramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis in Siena University Hospital, Italy. Results: Ultramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis has evidenced positive outcomes in terms of prognosis, infectious complications, volume reduction, and quality of life. The average cellulitis rate dropped from 2.5 episodes a year to 0.5 episodes after surgical intervention. The mean satisfaction index passed from 1.33 before the intervention to 2.83. Conclusion: Ultramicrosurgical lymphatico-venular anastomosis represents a challenging physiological approach for male genital lymphedema with promising outcomes. © 2019 The Authors
Gennaro, P., Gabriele, G., Aboh, I.V., Cascino, F., Zerini, F., & Aboud, M.G. (2019). Ultramicrosurgery: A new approach to treat primary male genital lymphedema. JPRAS OPEN, 20, 72-80 [10.1016/j.jpra.2019.01.007].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/1086775