Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of carbohydrate intolerance, with onset or first recognition during second or third trimester of gestation. It is estimated that approximately 7% of all pregnancies are complicated by GDM and that its prevalence is rising all over the world. Thus, the screening for abnormal glucose levels is generally recommended as a routine component of care for pregnant women. However, additional biomarkers are needed in order to predict the onset or accurately monitor the status of gestational diabetes. Recently, microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs demonstrated to modulate gene expression, have been proven to be secreted by cells of origin and can be found in many biological fluids such as serum or plasma. Such feature renders microRNAs as optimal biomarkers and sensors of in situ tissue alterations. Furthermore, secretion of microRNAs via exosomes has been reported to contribute to tissue cross talk, thus potentially represents, if disrupted, a mechanistic cause of tissue/cell dysfunction in a specific disease. In this review, we summarized the recent findings on circulating microRNAs and gestational diabetes mellitus with particular focus on the potential use of microRNAs as putative biomarkers of disease as well as a potential cause of GDM complications and β cell dysfunction.

Guarino, E., Poggi, C.D., Grieco, G.E., Cenci, V., Ceccarelli, E., Crisci, I., et al. (2018). Circulating MicroRNAs as biomarkers of gestational diabetes mellitus: Updates and perspectives. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, 2018, 1-11 [10.1155/2018/6380463].

Circulating MicroRNAs as biomarkers of gestational diabetes mellitus: Updates and perspectives

GRIECO, GIUSEPPINA EMANUELA;CENCI, VALERIA;Ceccarelli, Elena;Sebastiani, Guido;Dotta, Francesco
2018-01-01

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of carbohydrate intolerance, with onset or first recognition during second or third trimester of gestation. It is estimated that approximately 7% of all pregnancies are complicated by GDM and that its prevalence is rising all over the world. Thus, the screening for abnormal glucose levels is generally recommended as a routine component of care for pregnant women. However, additional biomarkers are needed in order to predict the onset or accurately monitor the status of gestational diabetes. Recently, microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs demonstrated to modulate gene expression, have been proven to be secreted by cells of origin and can be found in many biological fluids such as serum or plasma. Such feature renders microRNAs as optimal biomarkers and sensors of in situ tissue alterations. Furthermore, secretion of microRNAs via exosomes has been reported to contribute to tissue cross talk, thus potentially represents, if disrupted, a mechanistic cause of tissue/cell dysfunction in a specific disease. In this review, we summarized the recent findings on circulating microRNAs and gestational diabetes mellitus with particular focus on the potential use of microRNAs as putative biomarkers of disease as well as a potential cause of GDM complications and β cell dysfunction.
Guarino, E., Poggi, C.D., Grieco, G.E., Cenci, V., Ceccarelli, E., Crisci, I., et al. (2018). Circulating MicroRNAs as biomarkers of gestational diabetes mellitus: Updates and perspectives. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, 2018, 1-11 [10.1155/2018/6380463].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11365/1055801