The distinction cause/effect is often linked to the distinction before/after [Michotte, 1946 La Perception de la Causalite ̈ (Louvain: Institut Supe ̈ rieur de Philosophie)]. We run two experi- ments referring to Michotte's launch-effect paradigm, to test the hypothesis that it is possible to perceive a relationship of causation when (I) the second member B of the succession disappears before being touched by the first member A (from 450 ms of anticipation to 366 ms of delay), and when (II), given the simultaneity of the stopping of A and the vanishing of B, B is not in contact with A (from 1 to 70 mm) and it is in different spatial positions. Experimental results show that the perception of causation persists even (i) if B disappears 170 ms before A ceases its motion, and (ii) if the distance between the two squares is about 6 mm. The position of B is not relevant. The conclusions are: (1) an event can be perceived as an effect even when it occurs before the first event, perceived as the cause, finishes; (2) since the event effect is not a motion, there is no room for the Michotte's theory (about perception of causality) of amplification of the movement.

Parovel, G., Sinico, M., & Vicario, G.B. (2001). The disappearance effect. In Perception, Suppl. (pp.64-64).

The disappearance effect

PAROVEL, GIULIA;
2001

Abstract

The distinction cause/effect is often linked to the distinction before/after [Michotte, 1946 La Perception de la Causalite ̈ (Louvain: Institut Supe ̈ rieur de Philosophie)]. We run two experi- ments referring to Michotte's launch-effect paradigm, to test the hypothesis that it is possible to perceive a relationship of causation when (I) the second member B of the succession disappears before being touched by the first member A (from 450 ms of anticipation to 366 ms of delay), and when (II), given the simultaneity of the stopping of A and the vanishing of B, B is not in contact with A (from 1 to 70 mm) and it is in different spatial positions. Experimental results show that the perception of causation persists even (i) if B disappears 170 ms before A ceases its motion, and (ii) if the distance between the two squares is about 6 mm. The position of B is not relevant. The conclusions are: (1) an event can be perceived as an effect even when it occurs before the first event, perceived as the cause, finishes; (2) since the event effect is not a motion, there is no room for the Michotte's theory (about perception of causality) of amplification of the movement.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/21645
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