This paper intends to investigate some aspects of the Continental reception of Insular lexicographic legacy, in particular the diffusion of early Anglo-Saxon glossography in early medieval Germany. Several early manuscripts belonging to the so-called Leiden Family were copied on the Continent as early as the eighth century. A group of five manuscripts has attracted particular attention for their close mutual relationship: Épinal, Bibliothèque Municipale 72; Leiden, Universiteitsbibliothek, Voss. Lat. Q. 69; Erfurt/Gotha, Universitäts- und Forschungsbibliothek, Dep. Erf., Cod. Ampl. 2° 42; Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 144; the so-called Werden manuscript (dismembered). Finally, a sixth manuscript should be added: Berlin, Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin-Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Grimm-Nachlass 132,2 + 139,2 (fragments). Given the German origin of several manuscripts of the Leiden Family, the study of the possible interactions of the Old English items with the corresponding items in Old Saxon and Old High German offers a very interesting field of research. The study of these glossaries can afford a better assessment of the real effects of Anglo-Saxon cultural influence on the Continent, by detecting Old English glosses in manuscripts of Old Saxon and Old High German origin. The data concerning both the geographical and chronological width of the diffusion of the Old English glosses in the two languages is of crucial importance. Given these premises, two types of questions will be examined: 1) Where any glosses, contained in the Continental manuscipts related to the Leiden Family, translated in Old Saxon or Old High German? The Werden glossaries will provide matter for relevant examples; 2) How long were these words in evidence on the Continent? Some manuscripts of Middle Franconian origin will provide relevant examples. As a conclusion, it can be argued that the Continental copies of the Leiden Family glossaries taken in exam show a quite conservative Old English linguistic facies. The diffusion of these words in Germany seems to be restricted to given geographical areas, particularly to the Old Saxon and Middle Franconian regions. It can also be suggested that those glosses circulated only in restricted entourages and were probably employed exclusively for didactic use.

Digilio, M.R. (2011). The Fortune of Old English Glosses in Early Medieval Germany. In Rethinking and Recontextualizing Glosses: New Perspectives in the Study of Late Anglo-Saxon Glossography (pp. 371-395). Porto : Fédération Internationale des Instituts d'Études Médiévales.

The Fortune of Old English Glosses in Early Medieval Germany

DIGILIO, MARIA RITA
2011

Abstract

This paper intends to investigate some aspects of the Continental reception of Insular lexicographic legacy, in particular the diffusion of early Anglo-Saxon glossography in early medieval Germany. Several early manuscripts belonging to the so-called Leiden Family were copied on the Continent as early as the eighth century. A group of five manuscripts has attracted particular attention for their close mutual relationship: Épinal, Bibliothèque Municipale 72; Leiden, Universiteitsbibliothek, Voss. Lat. Q. 69; Erfurt/Gotha, Universitäts- und Forschungsbibliothek, Dep. Erf., Cod. Ampl. 2° 42; Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 144; the so-called Werden manuscript (dismembered). Finally, a sixth manuscript should be added: Berlin, Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin-Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Grimm-Nachlass 132,2 + 139,2 (fragments). Given the German origin of several manuscripts of the Leiden Family, the study of the possible interactions of the Old English items with the corresponding items in Old Saxon and Old High German offers a very interesting field of research. The study of these glossaries can afford a better assessment of the real effects of Anglo-Saxon cultural influence on the Continent, by detecting Old English glosses in manuscripts of Old Saxon and Old High German origin. The data concerning both the geographical and chronological width of the diffusion of the Old English glosses in the two languages is of crucial importance. Given these premises, two types of questions will be examined: 1) Where any glosses, contained in the Continental manuscipts related to the Leiden Family, translated in Old Saxon or Old High German? The Werden glossaries will provide matter for relevant examples; 2) How long were these words in evidence on the Continent? Some manuscripts of Middle Franconian origin will provide relevant examples. As a conclusion, it can be argued that the Continental copies of the Leiden Family glossaries taken in exam show a quite conservative Old English linguistic facies. The diffusion of these words in Germany seems to be restricted to given geographical areas, particularly to the Old Saxon and Middle Franconian regions. It can also be suggested that those glosses circulated only in restricted entourages and were probably employed exclusively for didactic use.
9782503542539
Digilio, M.R. (2011). The Fortune of Old English Glosses in Early Medieval Germany. In Rethinking and Recontextualizing Glosses: New Perspectives in the Study of Late Anglo-Saxon Glossography (pp. 371-395). Porto : Fédération Internationale des Instituts d'Études Médiévales.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Copertina.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Post-print
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 150.72 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
150.72 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Paper.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Post-print
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 195.99 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
195.99 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Indice.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Post-print
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 300.43 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
300.43 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11365/4747
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo